Employee Benefit Views

Food and bacteria matter in winning with wellness — but not only the ways you think

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Posted February 15, 2013 by By Kelley M. Butler at 12:17PM. Comments (0)

 

Obviously, nutrition http://ebn.benefitnews.com/news/wellness-food-full-yield-john-hancock-2717888-1.html is a big part of the wellness puzzle — better input, better output. To win the battle of the bulge http://ebn.benefitnews.com/news/obesity-wellness-cdc-optumhealth-ifebp-provant-kaiser-permanente-2727480-1.html, fewer cheeseburgers and more fruits and veggies is key.
However, those good-for-you foods can derail a sound wellness strategy as well — and perhaps even lead to higher health claims and absenteeism, according to new research. 
A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals that produce was the culprit in 46% of foodborne illnesses and 23% of foodborne deaths between 1998 and 2008. Poultry was second, at 19%.
So, take caution with produce to get the full wellness benefit!
In other nontraditional news, it turns out bacteria can be good for wellness — at least the kind in yogurt. In a joint study by the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, the Framingham Heart Study and the General Internal Medicine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, yogurt consumers had better diets overall that those who didn’t eat yogurt. 
In addition, the study found that yogurt consumption is linked to lower cholesterol, blood glucose, blood pressure http://ebn.benefitnews.com/news/blood-pressure-drugs-obesity-2710643-1.html and insulin resistance. Winning! 

Obviously, nutrition is a big part of the wellness puzzle — better input, better output. To win the battle of the bulge, fewer cheeseburgers and more fruits and veggies is key.

However, those good-for-you foods can derail a sound wellness strategy as well — and perhaps even lead to higher health claims and absenteeism, according to new research. 

A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals that produce was the culprit in 46% of foodborne illnesses and 23% of foodborne deaths between 1998 and 2008. Poultry was second, at 19%.

So, take caution with produce to get the full wellness benefit!

In other nontraditional news, it turns out bacteria can be good for wellness — at least the kind in yogurt. In a joint study by the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, the Framingham Heart Study and the General Internal Medicine Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, yogurt consumers had better diets overall that those who didn’t eat yogurt. 

In addition, the study found that yogurt consumption is linked to lower cholesterol, blood glucose, blood pressure and insulin resistance. Winning! 

 

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